The Progress of Loss (A poem)

Do you know what “shower thoughts” are? They’re little bursts of insight and creativity that other people have probably thought before you. Sometimes you get lucky, you hit a vein of gold, and that’s originality. I think a shower thought, combined with preparing dinner, might be a spark of originality, and this is the result of that thought.

I don’t usually do poetry, but when I do…it’s usually not terrible.

The Progress of Loss

Set out three plates; two larger, one smaller

Three forks and knives; two metal, one plastic

And get dinner from the oven.

Fill the pet’s food dish, top off the water,

And eat together.

The next day is a long one

A Bad one

The kind you don’t repeat

Or wish on an enemy.

You set out two plates

Two forks and knives; both metal

You put away the dish and bowl

And try to ignore the empty seat

The next day is a long one

A bad one

The kind you don’t repeat

Or wish on an enemy

You set out two paper plates

Two plastic forks and knives

Get dinner from the microwave

And you put away the empty seat

Repeat for a week

A month

A year

Set out one plate; a larger one

A fork and knife; both metal

Get dinner from the oven

And ignore the empty seats

This day has been a long one

A bad one

The kind you will repeat

And don’t wish on your enemy

Set out a paper plate

A fork and knife; both plastic

Get dinner from the microwave

You’ve put away the empty seats

This day has been a long one

A bad one

The kind you will repeat

And don’t wish on your enemy

Repeat for a week

A month

A year

Nobody sets out a plate

A fork, a knife

No food comes from the kitchen

And no empty chairs are waiting

The house is up for sale,

And nobody has lived here

For a week

A month

A year

 

Comments are welcome. Leave one here, or on Twitter (@ahahnjones).

Thanks for reading.

A luta continua.

Adam Jones recently released his debut novel, In the Land of God. It’s a story of multi-generational strife in a Midwestern family set during the First World War and the Great Depression. It’s available on Amazon as an eBook for $2.99 and as a paperback for $9.99.

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